Anthropology

Cultural Anthropology Annotated Bibliography

An annotated bibliography is a list of potential research sources pertaining to a specific topic. However, it is more than just a list of titles, because researchers evaluate and write concise descriptions or annotations for every item. Compiling an annotated bibliography is an excellent way to become acquainted with the material available on a particular topic; it forces the researcher to review the current literature and to seek out pertinent sources. Each potential source must be carefully read to determine its relevance to the selected topic. In addition to the bibliographic detail, each item in an annotated bibliography includes a summary of the main argument(s), an outline of the significant findings or conclusions, and a brief description of the research methods used (if applicable). Begin by identifying and defining the scope of your selected anthropological research topic. In doing so, try to answer these questions: What research question are you trying to examine? What is the locale for this research? What is the timeframe? Once you have clearly delineated your topic, you can begin searching for pertinent sources. You must locate a minimum of seven (7) sources, and at least three (3) of these must be contemporary sources. Each annotation must be at least one paragraph or about 200 words. All of the sources selected must be academic anthropological sources, that is, they must be written by anthropologists and appear in academic books or in professional anthropological publications. Although you must not include the course textbooks in your annotated bibliography, the “References” section of Cultural Anthropology (4th Canadian ed.) may be a useful starting point. You are also encouraged to consult Athabasca University Library’s online journal databases (e.g., JSTOR) to find sources. You may use several articles contained in one book as separate annotations—as long as each article is written by a different author, but you may not use different chapters in a single-author book as separate annotations. Your annotated bibliography assignment must include the following components: an introductory paragraph that clearly defines your selected anthropological research topic; a complete bibliographic citation of each of the seven (or more) sources selected; and a one-paragraph annotation of each of the above sources that includes a description of the purpose of the book or article, the methodology it used (i.e., how data was gathered and how it was used to develop the author’s arguments), the major conclusions, and any significant points relevant to the research topic selected.

Aug 14th, 2021

Anthropology

Cultural Anthropology Annotated Bibliography | GET SOLUTION

An annotated bibliography is a list of potential research sources pertaining to a specific topic. However, it is more than just a list of titles, because researchers evaluate and write concise descriptions or annotations for every item. Compiling an annotated bibliography is an excellent way to become acquainted with the material available on a particular topic; it forces the researcher to review the current literature and to seek out pertinent sources. Each potential source must be carefully read to determine its relevance to the selected topic. In addition to the bibliographic detail, each item in an annotated bibliography includes a summary of the main argument(s), an outline of the significant findings or conclusions, and a brief description of the research methods used (if applicable). Begin by identifying and defining the scope of your selected anthropological research topic. In doing so, try to answer these questions: What research question are you trying to examine? What is the locale for this research? What is the timeframe? Once you have clearly delineated your topic, you can begin searching for pertinent sources. You must locate a minimum of seven (7) sources, and at least three (3) of these must be contemporary sources. Each annotation must be at least one paragraph or about 200 words. All of the sources selected must be academic anthropological sources, that is, they must be written by anthropologists and appear in academic books or in professional anthropological publications. Although you must not include the course textbooks in your annotated bibliography, the “References” section of Cultural Anthropology (4th Canadian ed.) may be a useful starting point. You are also encouraged to consult Athabasca University Library’s online journal databases (e.g., JSTOR) to find sources. You may use several articles contained in one book as separate annotations—as long as each article is written by a different author, but you may not use different chapters in a single-author book as separate annotations. Your annotated bibliography assignment must include the following components: an introductory paragraph that clearly defines your selected anthropological research topic; a complete bibliographic citation of each of the seven (or more) sources selected; and a one-paragraph annotation of each of the above sources that includes a description of the purpose of the book or article, the methodology it used (i.e., how data was gathered and how it was used to develop the author’s arguments), the major conclusions, and any significant points relevant to the research topic selected.

Aug 14th, 2021

Anthropology

Backyard Archaeology

Choose one room of your home or a specific place in your community (playground, parking lot, restaurant).  Visit and observe the site for 10-15 minutes.   Map (photos, hand drawn and scanned, digitally created map) the site and describe the physical characteristics of the site.  These do not count toward the 4-6 page estimate for the assignment. Collect and document artifacts.  Describe the artifacts noting color, shape, weight, texture, quantity, material, and other features you think are important.  Be objective as you examine the site, remember not to mention what it is in today’s terms, but pretend you have do not recognize or have knowledge of the artifacts and site Using your imagination, what are some other purposes the artifacts and site might have?  What conclusions can you draw about the origin of the artifacts, their use, and the purpose of the site? Using our course materials, what type of archaeological tools and methods would you want to use to help you interpret your artifacts and site?   Reflect on some of the challenges archaeologists face in piecing together the past. Cite at least one of our course materials in your paper.  This typically works best in steps 5 and/or 6. All written submissions should be submitted using APA formatting. In part, this includes: Typewritten in double-spaced format with a readable style and font and submitted inside the electronic classroom. Arial 11 or 12-point font or Times New Roman styles. Page margins Top, Bottom, Left Side and Right Side = 1 inch, with reasonable accommodation being made for special situations and online submission variances.  Save as .doc, .rtf, or .pdf

Aug 14th, 2021

Anthropology

The Experience of Women in Popular Hinduism

STRICTLY based on the 11 readings provided, answer the following question: the experience of women in popular Hinduism.  Do NOT use outside resources. The ONLY acceptable references are the ones below, which can all be found on google.  *PLEASE USE SUBHEADINGS IN THE ESSAY, AND STRICTLY LIMIT IT TO 4000 WORDS. DIRECT QUOTATIONS REQUIRE INTEXT CITATIONS* References Arumugam, Indira. 2015. “‘The Old Gods Are Losing Power!’ Theologies of Power and Rituals of Productivity in a Tamil Nadu Village.” Mod. Asian Stud. Modern Asian Studies 49 (3): 753–86 Boisvert, Mathieu. 2017. “Ritual Kinship among Hindu Pilgrimage Priests of Allahabad.” Anthropologica59 (2): 310–21. Deliège, Robert. 2011. “Caste, Class, and Untouchability.” In A Companion to the Anthropology of India, edited by Isabelle Clark-Decès, 45-61. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. Flueckiger, Joyce. 2015. “Loving and Serving God: Bhakti, Murtis, and Puja.” In Everyday Hinduism, 73-96. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell. Flueckiger, Joyce. 2015. “Vrats: Ritual Vows and Women’s Auspiciousness.” In Everyday Hinduism, 145-168. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell. Fuller, C. J. 2004. “Chapter 3: Worship.” In The Camphor Flame: Popular Hinduism and Society in India –Revised and Expanded Edition, 57-82. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press. Fuller, C. J. 2004. “Chapter 9: Pilgrimage.” In The Camphor Flame: Popular Hinduism and Society in India – Revised and Expanded Edition, 204-223. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press. Gupta, Dipankar. 2005. “Caste and Politics: Identity over System.” Annual Review of Anthropology 34: 409–27. Parry, Jonathan. 1981. “Death and Cosmogony in Kashi.” Contributions to Indian Sociology 15 (1–2): 337–65. Rao, Ursula. 2006. “Ritual and Society.” In Theorizing Rituals, edited by Jens Kreinath, Jan Snoek, and Michael Stausberg, 143-160. Studies in the History of Religions 114. Leiden; Boston: Brill. Srinivas, Tulasi. 2018. “Chapter One: Adventures in Modern Dwelling.” In The Cow in the Elevator: An Anthropology of Wonder, 34-57. Durham: Duke University press.

Aug 14th, 2021

Anthropology

Evolution

We might consider the origin, dispersal, and growth of Homo sapiens populations, such that our own species now occupies virtually all regions of the earth, to be the earliest form of globalization. Today, globalization is characterized by the movement of ideas and products between the individuals and societies that make up our worldwide population. How does the process of globalization affect human biocultural variation and evolution? (Hint: Think about the ways in which changes in nutrition and technology have an impact on health and lifestyle across a wide range of population settings.) *at the end of every paragraph please put the person’s name and years for every source you use.

Aug 14th, 2021

Anthropology

Family

What does family mean to you? Does that reflect the understanding(s) of family in Canada or in the country where you are from? Do you have fictive kin in your life? Where do different understandings of family come from and what is the impact of that?

Aug 14th, 2021

Anthropology

Backyard Archaeology | GET SOLUTION

Choose one room of your home or a specific place in your community (playground, parking lot, restaurant).  Visit and observe the site for 10-15 minutes.   Map (photos, hand drawn and scanned, digitally created map) the site and describe the physical characteristics of the site.  These do not count toward the 4-6 page estimate for the assignment. Collect and document artifacts.  Describe the artifacts noting color, shape, weight, texture, quantity, material, and other features you think are important.  Be objective as you examine the site, remember not to mention what it is in today’s terms, but pretend you have do not recognize or have knowledge of the artifacts and site Using your imagination, what are some other purposes the artifacts and site might have?  What conclusions can you draw about the origin of the artifacts, their use, and the purpose of the site? Using our course materials, what type of archaeological tools and methods would you want to use to help you interpret your artifacts and site?   Reflect on some of the challenges archaeologists face in piecing together the past. Cite at least one of our course materials in your paper.  This typically works best in steps 5 and/or 6. All written submissions should be submitted using APA formatting. In part, this includes: Typewritten in double-spaced format with a readable style and font and submitted inside the electronic classroom. Arial 11 or 12-point font or Times New Roman styles. Page margins Top, Bottom, Left Side and Right Side = 1 inch, with reasonable accommodation being made for special situations and online submission variances.  Save as .doc, .rtf, or .pdf

Aug 14th, 2021

Anthropology

The Experience of Women in Popular Hinduism | GET SOLUTION

STRICTLY based on the 11 readings provided, answer the following question: the experience of women in popular Hinduism.  Do NOT use outside resources. The ONLY acceptable references are the ones below, which can all be found on google.  *PLEASE USE SUBHEADINGS IN THE ESSAY, AND STRICTLY LIMIT IT TO 4000 WORDS. DIRECT QUOTATIONS REQUIRE INTEXT CITATIONS* References Arumugam, Indira. 2015. “‘The Old Gods Are Losing Power!’ Theologies of Power and Rituals of Productivity in a Tamil Nadu Village.” Mod. Asian Stud. Modern Asian Studies 49 (3): 753–86 Boisvert, Mathieu. 2017. “Ritual Kinship among Hindu Pilgrimage Priests of Allahabad.” Anthropologica59 (2): 310–21. Deliège, Robert. 2011. “Caste, Class, and Untouchability.” In A Companion to the Anthropology of India, edited by Isabelle Clark-Decès, 45-61. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. Flueckiger, Joyce. 2015. “Loving and Serving God: Bhakti, Murtis, and Puja.” In Everyday Hinduism, 73-96. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell. Flueckiger, Joyce. 2015. “Vrats: Ritual Vows and Women’s Auspiciousness.” In Everyday Hinduism, 145-168. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell. Fuller, C. J. 2004. “Chapter 3: Worship.” In The Camphor Flame: Popular Hinduism and Society in India –Revised and Expanded Edition, 57-82. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press. Fuller, C. J. 2004. “Chapter 9: Pilgrimage.” In The Camphor Flame: Popular Hinduism and Society in India – Revised and Expanded Edition, 204-223. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press. Gupta, Dipankar. 2005. “Caste and Politics: Identity over System.” Annual Review of Anthropology 34: 409–27. Parry, Jonathan. 1981. “Death and Cosmogony in Kashi.” Contributions to Indian Sociology 15 (1–2): 337–65. Rao, Ursula. 2006. “Ritual and Society.” In Theorizing Rituals, edited by Jens Kreinath, Jan Snoek, and Michael Stausberg, 143-160. Studies in the History of Religions 114. Leiden; Boston: Brill. Srinivas, Tulasi. 2018. “Chapter One: Adventures in Modern Dwelling.” In The Cow in the Elevator: An Anthropology of Wonder, 34-57. Durham: Duke University press.

Aug 14th, 2021

Anthropology

The life of a Homo Erectus

Paper Physical Anthropology Paper Due August 11 Submit to canvas  3-4 pages: double spaced, times new roman, 12 font At least 3 sources   Choose 1 hominin Part 1: Write 2-3 pages discussing your hominin. Formal writing. NO QUOTES!   Suggested things to discuss: What is the taxonomy (how it relates to other hominins) Is there any controversy surrounding the hominin When did they live and in what type of environment Characteristics: derived and ancestral Any behavioral traits   ** You do not have to write about all of these or any of them. Tell me what you want me to know about the species you choose. These are here to help you if you get stuck   Whichever citing format you choose IN-TEXT CITATION     Part II: Create a fake Tinder account for your hominin (1 page) If your hominin was alive today and had Tinder, what would their profile look like Be creative!!! –  I want a good bio!   This can be the first or last page   Orrorin tugenensis Sahelanthropus tchadensis Ardipithecus kadabba Ardipithecus ramidus Australopithecus anamensis Australopithecus afarensis Australopithecus platyops Paranthropus aethiopicus Paranthropus boisei Paranthropus robustus Australopithecus africanus Australopithecus sediba Australopithecus garhi Homo habilis Homo rudolfensis Homo erectus Homo naledi Homo floresiensis Homo heidelbergensis Homo neanderthalensis Denisovans

Aug 14th, 2021

Anthropology

African and History

Directions Compose a response of at least 275 words in which you: Discuss how Africa fits into world or Western history. Compare and contrast the opinions of Europeans and Americans in relation to Africa and its people. Determine what you think is the most important lesson to be taken away from African history and defend your assessment.

Aug 14th, 2021

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